Program Planning for Infants and Toddlers ebook

$62.97

Programme Planning for Infants and Toddlers: In Search of Relationships is designed as a resource for students and caregivers of infants and toddlers in group settings.

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Programme Planning for Infants and Toddlers: In Search of Relationships is designed as a resource for students and caregivers of infants and toddlers in group settings.

It supports the curricula of both New Zealand — Te Whāriki, and Australia — Early Years Learning Framework, with particular reference to how these curricula relate to children three years and under. Each chapter includes the relevant goals/outcomes from these curricula, links to the Australian National Quality Standards for early childhood education and care and school aged care, learning objectives for the chapter and reflective exercises that assist the reader in integrating and applying the theoretical concepts.

Margaret Sims is Professor of Early Childhood at the University of New England, and Honorary Professor at Macquarie University.

Teresa Hutchins is a Regional Program Co-ordinator with World Vision Australia and is responsible for managing the Warlpiri Early Childhood Care and Development project in the Central Desert Region of Australia.

“I have admiration and respect for the advocacy of Teresa Hutchins and Margaret Sims in highlighting the importance of care and education for infants and tod- dlers across various socio-cultural contexts and I share their desire for dialogue about the ways in which we can optimise early learning. In this edition they introduce readers to current curricula goals/practices in Australia and New Zealand which reflect a cross-fertilisation of ideas that contribute to and enhance reflective practice.

Teresa and Margaret have identified the key focus of an infant toddler curriculum as involving relationships, care moments and play. When infants and toddlers are viewed as active learners and not passive recipients of external influence, many opportunities exist for adults to perceive the child’s sphere of influence as ‘teacher’ as well as ‘learner’.”

– Jean Rockel

Honorary Academic
Faculty of Education and Social Work The University of Auckland, New Zealand